Scholarly Pieces by Women on DFW

This list is the first in a series of lists of women involved in David Foster Wallace studies and the DFW community.  It is not complete, nor is it static.  It is a list of what we have been able to find right now.

  • Katrin Amian includes a few of Wallace’s fictional works in her exploration of pragmatism and postmodernism in Rethinking Postmodernism(s): Charles S. Peirce and the Pragmatist Negotiations of Thomas Pynchon, Toni Morrison, and Jonathan Safran Foer
  • Jo Ann Bear’s afterword to “Consider the Lobster” in The David Foster Wallace Reader
  • Kasia Boddy’s essay, “A Fiction of Response: Girl with Curious Hair in Context” in A Companion to David Foster Wallace Studies
  • Clare Hayes-Brady’s essay, “‘…’: Language, Gender, and Modes of Power in the Work of David Foster Wallace” in A Companion to David Foster Wallace Studies
  • Maria Bustillos’s essay. “Philosophy, Self-Help, and the Death of David Foster Wallace” in Gesturing toward Reality: David Foster Wallace and Philosophy
  • Kate Crawford presents her essay on DFW’s creative journalism at ABC Fora’s Remembering David Foster Wallace: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbAo44CfUDM&t=24s
  • Shannon Elderon’s essay, “The Shaping of Storied Selves in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King” in Critique
  • Anne Marie Donohue’s interview with Wallace, “David Foster Wallace Winces at the Suggestion That His Book is Sloppy in Any Sense” in Conversations with David Foster Wallace
  • Helen Dudar’s interview with Wallace, “A Whiz Kid and his Wacky First Novel” in Conversations with David Foster Wallace
  • Clare Fabre’s “Ordinaire Psycho-(poé)tique de Girl with [the] Curious Hair de David Foster Wallace”
  • Anne Fadiman’s afterword to “Getting Away from Already Pretty Much Being Away from It All” in the David Foster Wallace Reader
  • Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s essay “Infinite Summer: Reading, Empathy, and the Social Network” in The Legacy of David Foster Wallace
  • Elizabeth Freudenthal’s essay “Anti-Interiority: Compulsiveness, Objectification, and Identity in Infinite Jest” in New Literary History
  • Kendall Gerdes’s essay, “Habit-Forming: Humility and the Rhetoric of Drugs” in Philosophy and Rhetoric
  • Catherine Gubernatis Dannen’s essay “Sports and the Life of the Mind: Sports Media in the Freshman Composition Classroom” in Pedagogy
  • Chloe Harrison’s chapter, “Attentional Windowing in DFW’s ‘The Soul is Not a Smithy’” in Cognitive Grammar in Literature
  • N. Katherine Hayles’s essay, “The Illusion of Autonomy and the Fact of Recursivity: Virtual Ecologies, Entertainment and Infinite Jest” in New Literary History*
    *Hayles was, according to the MLA International Database, the first woman to publish on Wallace in 1993
  • Rachel Haley Himmelheber’s essay, “‘I Believed She Could Save Me’: Rape Culture in David Foster Wallace’s ‘Brief Interviews with Hideous Men #20’” in Critique
  • Emily J. Hogg’s essay, “Subjective Politics in The Pale King” in English Studies
  • Mary K. Holland’s essay “‘The Art’s Heart’s Purpose’: Braving the Narcissistic Loop of David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest” in Critique (accessible via Academia.edu)
  • Mary K. Holland’s essay, “‘By Hirsute Author’: Gender and Communication in the Work and Study of David Foster Wallace” in Critique (accessible via Academia.edu)
  • Mary K. Holland’s chapter, “Mediated Immediacy in Brief Interviews with Hideous Men” in A Companion to David Foster Wallace Studies
  • Heather Houser’s chapter, “Infinite Jest’s Environmental Case for Disgust” in The Legacy of David Foster Wallace (accessible via Academia.edu)
  • Heather Houser’s essay, “Managing Information and Materiality in Infinite Jest and Running the Numbers” in American Literary History (accessible via Academia.edu)
  • Jennifer Howard’s article, “The Afterlife of David Foster Wallace” in The Chronicle of Higher Education: http://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Afterlife-of-David-Foster/125823
  • Mary Karr, Dana Spiotta, Mark Costello, and Deborah Treisman, speakers: Rereading David Foster Wallace – The New Yorker Festival: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqN52yKI4pg
  • Zuzanna Ladyga’s chapter, “The Return of the Pastoral: The Televisual Poetics of David Foster Wallace” in Projecting Words, Writing Images: Intersections of the Textual and Visual in American Cultural Practices
  • Laura Miller’s interview, “The Salon Interview: David Foster Wallace” in Conversations with David Foster Wallace
  • Tara Morrissey and Lucas Thompson’s essay, “‘The Rare White at the Window’: A Reappraisal of Mark Costello and David Foster Wallace’s Signifying Rappers” in Journal of American Studies
  • Catherine Nichols’s essay “Dialogizing Postmodern Carnival: David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest” in Critique
  • Christine Peffer’s chapter, “City upon the Convexity: The Satire of American Exceptionalism in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest” in Towards a Post-Exceptionalist American Studies
  • Emily Russell’s essay, “Some Assembly Required: The Embodied Politics of Infinite Jest” in Arizona Quarterly
  • Joanna Scott talks about Wallace and his work with fellow panelists at Everything and More: A Tribute to David Foster Wallace, Conversation
  • https://podcast.lannan.org/2011/03/26/everything-and-more-a-tribute-to-david-foster-wallace-conversation-16-march-2011-video/
  • Joanna Scott reads selections from Wallace’s works at Everything and More: A Tribute to David Foster Wallace: https://podcast.lannan.org/2011/03/26/everything-and-more-a-tribute-to-david-foster-wallace-reading-3-16-march-2011-video/
  • Molly Schwartzburg’s essay “Conclusion: Observations on the Archive at the Harry Ransom Center” in The Legacy of David Foster Wallace
  • Gila Sher’s chapter “Wallace, Free Choice, and Fatalism” in Freedom and the Self: Essays on the Philosophy of David Foster Wallace
  • Zadie Smith on Brief Interviews with Hideous Men in Five Dials: http://fivedials.com/files/fivedials_no10.pdf
  • Zadie Smith’s longer essay on BIWHM: chapter 17 entitled “Brief Interviews with Hideous Men: The Difficult Gifts of David Foster Wallace” in Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays
  • Alessandra Tedesco’s essay “Authority, Knowledge and (In)Humanity in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest” in Interdisciplinary Humanities
  • Nicoline Timmer analyzes Infinite Jest and uses Wallace’s critical theory to open up texts in Do You Feel It Too? The Post-Postmodern Syndrome in American Fiction at the Turn of the Millennium
  • Catherine Toal’s essay, “Corrections: Contemporary American Melancholy” in Journal of European Studies
  • Stacy Weida’s essay, “Becoming the New Man in Post-Postmodern Fiction: Portrayals of Masculinities in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest and Chuck Palahniuk’s Fight Club” in Men & Masculinities

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